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Cool story, Morgan, another little bit of (dark) history.

I have visited "Training Schools", sometimes with other names, in Ireland and elsewhere.
Many of them have a "dark history", as well. Sorry to hear of this in Colorado. Always good to shed some light on this. Thanks.

Interesting article. I am wondering if you discovered any entries about lawsuits filed in the 1970s about the conditions at Ridge. I am doing research on the deinstitutionalization of people living in large asylums, with a special interest in civil rights cases designed to improve conditions and sometimes close them. Thanks for your help.

Actually, part of the buildings do still stand and are abandoned.

My Great Aunt, Velma A Brown, lived here for a time in the 1940's.

Do the buildings still stand

In 1964, I went to Ridge Home on a field trip, I saw the things that are written about in the stories that I've been reading. Our class of about 15, went thru the entire place, starting with the jailed violent patients, we walked thru their cell area, they were locked up and kept yelling at us as we walked thru, we went to another building where we saw people milling around, talking to themselves, people were staring for hours without moving, women were just sitting there staring, some had had their periods, and blood was all over their dresses, we went into the crib room, where there were adults in their 60's, about 4" tall and in diapers and in cribs, I saw children with heads twice the size as ours in cribs, they couldn't sit up, they were called crib cases, i saw the people who were born with no limbs, people who had extra limbs, every kind of mutant you could imagine in your wildest dream, or nightmare. I met a woman who was there forever, she was very wealthy from inheritance but was insane, never to enjoy her money, I saw all types of what we called the mentally insane, something i will never forget, we started at the worst, then worked our way up to the rehab area, supposedly, as you went thru rehab stages, you eventually ended up in the solo living area, on your way to being released into the public. I often what ever happened to these poor souls. This is just one of many of these facilities in the world, they are all closed or kept from the publics eye's, but these inmates do exist, many of them, with defects beyond your imagination, they are not to be ignored, our feared, they were born that way, I will never forget that experience.

my girlfriend at the time (my wife now) and I worked there in 1967-1968. We were called retardation technician trainee's, at the bottom of the chain. We will never forget the privilege of working with the residents, (of all ages infant to geriatric) we visited on our days off, met family members, became invested and involved with their families. The most rewarding effort of our lives, times and approach have changed but the Ridge Home we knew, and the staff we worked with did the best job we could with love and compassion, no darkness

Hi Eddie, it sounds like you had a very positive impact on the residents and families, just as they impacted you. Thank you so much for reading and sharing your experience with us!

I'm so happy to have read this kindness. I remember being about 5 or 6 and we went to visit my sister there. My mother told me the doctors had referred her there for testing. She had been there for two weeks and when we walked in she was screaming and crying not to leave her there. It was 1965 in May. It was so heartbreaking. She stayed with us up until she was 45. God rest her soul.

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