Beginning April 20, the 2nd and 3rd floors of the Blair-Caldwell Branch Library are closed. The archives and book collection on 2nd floor are in the process of being moved to Central Library where they will be available via the Special Collections Reading Room on 1st floor starting May 1.

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Thanks this was a great piece. We appreciate your research and writing.

Thanks for reading our content. I'm just lucky to be immersed in such amazing resources.

 

So interesting - and chilling! Thank you for this piece of history!

Thanks and keep checking back. We have more spooky stories coming to the blog this month. 

I appreciate your work on the murders and the aftermath. I will add your new information to my upcoming book Urban Pioneers which details the evolution of immigrant communities in North Denver/Highland/the Northside and in Globeville. My time frame is 1858-the present.
I especially appreciate the pictures of Arrata and Allesandri.

Excellent! Feel free to look me up on the 5th floor sometime. I'm sure we have a ton of great materials that would fit with your book. 

Hi Rebecca:
When do you think your book will be available for purchase? My maternal Grandmother’s Family (Ciancio) played a role in Welby, Swansea, Globeville, and Adams County.

Hi, I came across this article while compiling information for a series in development. I myself am a direct descendant of the Lake County Nachtrieb Family. I thought I would add to your narrative regarding the obscure Julia Murray. I don't know much about her, however, it was reported at the time, she committed suicide by hanging in which her neck was found "not" broken. She had used a bed cord and died of asphyxiation. It was said she was in jail for several months for passing a counterfeit $20 bill. She suffered from syphilis and was being treated in jail. It is suspected she ended her life to end her suffering from the disease. Cheers

What a great reminder of the gift that is penicillin. It would not surprise me if the coroner was incorrect. Horan was, after all, a mortician rather than a modern forensic pathologist. Feel free to contact me about your series. I'd love to hear more about it and your research.

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