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The sad thing is that while retail facilities are basically viewed by developers as "equipment" that becomes obsolete, malls like Cinderella City were like town centers for the people who used them and they tended to develop emotional attachments to them. There are a number of "dead malls of America" sites on the internet and they're all full of comments by viewers about their memories of shopping there, or taking dates out to movies, or just hanging around. I don't think that it's feasible to repurpose these places (especially if it's falling down like CC was) but it's a bit dispiriting to know that places you grow up around and become attached to will almost certainly be wiped away during your lifetime.

Great point, Jude. Most people don't seem to have the same kind of emotional attachment to outdoor shopping centers that they had to indoor malls. 

Good point Jude -- shopping malls were like town centers where people would often go just to "hang around." No place seems to be filling this void. Libraries have also long been community centers to some degree, but not so much for the socializing extent that malls were. Most centers/venues now are in/buy/out, and outdoor plazas often aren't the most pleasant places due to weather and noise.

You're right on the money, Joe. Our shared public spaces are a lot smaller, and there are fewer of them, than they once were. 

There were so many malls in those days and now most of them have disappeared - U-Hills, Northglenn, Cinderella City, Villa Italia, Buckingham, Crossroads. Yikes!

Hi Suzanne - Thanks for commenting. It is hard to believe that the malls that were permanent fixtures of our childhood memories could turn to trash heaps in such a short time. Such is the ever changing nature of retail sales! 

And Bear Valley, North Valley, Westminster, and Westland.

I miss the malls. Villa Italia, Westminster and the best one was Cinderella City. RIP

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