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There’s a typo, last paragraph. Should read “kerosene-soaked logs”

Good catch, Katoe. Thanks for letting us know.

Any information about the time period when Ruby Hill was used as a landfill? Thanks.

Hi Linda - I think that would be a whole other blog! We did find that the owners of Ruby Hill at the time of the bonfire also owned one of the nearby brick yards.  

I have to ask Dad if he remembers this. He would have been 4 years old. His family house at that time was on the corner of Evans Ave & Fox St. The house is still there at 2110 S. Fox.

Hi Mike - At that address, they probably didn't need to turn on the heat when the bonfire was going!

In the late 1950's the Englewood Police discovered a large box of very old and sweating dynamite. They called the Denver Fire Department who had the only bomb disposeable unit in the metro area. The head of Denver Fire's Arson and bomb was my father. Sweating dynamite indicates it is very unstable and is nitro . It was determined that due to the unstable explosive they would take it to the junk yard at Ruby Hill and detonate it. So at approximately the same location of the car bonfire of 30 years earlier the highly unstable dynamite was set off. The resulting blast broke windows with the shock wave for a huge area of south and west Denver and Englewood. I never did find out who paid for the glass replacements. I am still kidded about the event by friends. So Ruby Hill has a historic checkered history.

Hi Jim - That is a pretty amazing story! I'm glad they were able to safely transport the sweating dynamite! Windows are replaceable, but the folks in the Arson and Bomb Unit weren't!

Great posting Brian.
Ruby Hill was also the site of Christmas trees burned in mid January when I was a kid. Not sure of the year, mid to late 50s. Definitely a step up from the Klan actions on Ruby Hill in the 1920s.

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