Western History & Genealogy Blog

Ralph Ehrenberg Lecture

The Rocky Mountain Map Society and the Western History and Genealogy Department are pleased to present a lecture by Ralph Ehrenberg from the Library of Congress on April 20, 2010 at 5:30 PM in the Gates Conference Room, 5th floor, Denver Public Library, 10 W. 14th Avenue Parkway, Denver, Colorado.

Mr. Ehrenberg will describe geographical knowledge of the West on the eve of the Lewis and Clark expedition; the cartographic contributions of Indians, fur trappers, and the German explorer, Alexander von Humboldt; and William Clark's composite 1814 map of the West.

The talk is free and open to the public.

The public is invited to a dinner after the lecture at approximately 7 PM in a private dining room at Maggiano's Little Italy, 500 16th Street, Denver.($50 per person at the door, no credit cards please.)

Ralph Ehrenberg is the former chief of the Geography and Map Division of the Library of Congress and former director of the Center for Cartographic and Architectural Archives at the National Archives and Records Administration. He is a founding member and past president of the Washington Map Society, and past president and Fellow of the Society for History of Discoveries. He is the author of Mapping the World An Illustrated History of Cartography (National Geographic Society, 2005); The Mapping of America, with Seymour Schwartz (Wellfleet, 2001), and Scholars' Guide to Washington, D. C. for Cartography and Remote Sensing Imagery (Smithsonian Institution Press, 1987).

He is currently writing several essays for the University of Chicago's History of Cartography volume 6 on 20th century cartography relating to airline maps and aeronautical charts, but still continues his interest in 19th-century western exploration and mapping.

The Rocky Mountain Map Society is a non-profit organization dedicated to the study and appreciation of maps, cartographic history, the history of exploration and discovery, maps as art, and other areas of cartographic interest.

For further details, please visit the Rocky Mountain Map Society website.

Thanks!

Sounds interesting.